International Society of Hypertension

ISH partnership with the International Society of Nephrology

On 13-17 March 2015, the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) hosted the Biennial World Congress of Nephrology in Cape Town, South Africa. Recognising the close relationship with hypertension, the ISN partnered with the International Society of Hypertension (ISH) to co-host a session on 'Hypertension and the metabolic syndrome: New anthropologic and pathophysiologic insights'.

Alta Schutte pictureAlta Schutte, Executive Council Member, represented the ISH as Session Chair. The Session included invited speakers Brian Rayner (South Africa), Bernardo Rodriques-Iturbe (Venezuela), and Laura Lozada (Mexico) and amongst others covered in-depth discussions on the role of auto-immunity, inflammation and salt-sensitive hypertension. The session was well received by the audience, and was specifically selected by the organisers for live streaming, and for accepting questions from a global audience via Twitter.

Alta Schutte shown left

 

Session: Hypertension and the metabolic syndrome: New anthropologic and pathophysiologic insights (in parnership with ISH)


Session Chair:  A. Schutte, South Africa
 

Session Chair:  C. Zoccali, Italy
 

An anthropologic view of the metabolic syndrome: The back-to-Africa hypothesis 

Speaker:  L. Sanchez Lozada, Mexico

Click here to view presentation

Salt-sensitive hypertension 

Speaker:  B. Rayner, South AfricaBrian Rayner presentation

Click here to view presentation

Hypertension: A new auto-immune disease 

Speaker:  B. Rodriguez-Iturbe, Venezuela

Click here to view presentation

ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS INHIBITION PREVENTS THE DEVELOPMENT OF ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION 

Oral Presentation:  J. Dickhout, Canada

Click here to view presentation

 

 

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